Film & Television

TV Series

Band of Brothers is a 2001 American war drama miniseries based on historian Stephen E. Ambrose's 1992 non-fiction book of the same name. It was created by Steven Spielberg and Tom Hanks, who also served as executive producers, and who had collaborated on the 1998 World War II film Saving Private Ryan. Episodes first aired on HBO starting on September 9, 2001. The series won the Emmy and Golden Globe awards for best miniseries.
My Big Fat Greek Life is an American sitcom television series that ran on CBS from February 24 to April 13, 2003. The series is a continuation of the 2002 movie My Big Fat Greek Wedding and was produced by Sony Pictures Television and Tom Hanks's Playtone Productions for CBS. The two lead characters' names are changed, from Toula and Ian, to Nia and Thomas.  Series star Nia Vardalos also oversaw the show as one of the co-executive producers, along with Hanks and his wife Rita Wilson, who made a guest appearance in one episode as Nia's cousin.
Big Love is an American drama television series that aired on HBO from March 12, 2006, to March 20, 2011. It stars Bill Paxton as the patriarch of a fundamentalist Mormon family in contemporary Utah that practices polygamy, with Jeanne Tripplehorn, Chloë Sevigny, and Ginnifer Goodwin portraying his wives. The series charts the family's life in and out of the public sphere in their Salt Lake City suburb, as well as their associations with a fundamentalist compound in the area. It features key supporting performances from Amanda Seyfried, Grace Zabriskie, Daveigh Chase, Matt Ross, Mary Kay Place, Bruce Dern, Melora Walters, and Harry Dean Stanton.
John Adams is a 2008 American television miniseries chronicling most of U.S. president John Adams's political life and his role in the founding of the United States. The miniseries was directed by Tom Hooper and starred Paul Giamatti in the title role. Kirk Ellis wrote the screenplay based on the 2001 book John Adams by David McCullough. The biopic of Adams and the story of the first 50 years of the United States was broadcast in seven parts by HBO between March 16 and April 20, 2008. John Adams received widespread critical acclaim and many prestigious awards. The show won 4 Golden Globe awards and 13 Emmy awards, more than any other miniseries in history.
The Pacific is a 2010 American war drama miniseries produced by HBO, Playtone, and DreamWorks that premiered in the United States on March 14, 2010. The series is a companion piece to the 2001 miniseries Band of Brothers and focuses on the United States Marine Corps's actions in the Pacific Theater of Operations within the wider Pacific War. Whereas Band of Brothers followed the men of Easy Company of the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment through the European Theater, The Pacific centers on the experiences of three Marines (Robert Leckie, Eugene Sledge, and John Basilone) who were in different regiments (1st, 5th, and 7th, respectively) of the 1st Marine Division.
Game Change is a 2012 American political drama television film based on events of the 2008 United States presidential election campaign of John McCain, directed by Jay Roach and written by Danny Strong, based on the 2010 book of the same name documenting the campaign by political journalists Mark Halperin and John Heilemann. The film stars Julianne Moore, Woody Harrelson, and Ed Harris, and focuses on the chapters about the selection and performance of Governor of Alaska Sarah Palin (Moore) as running mate to Senator John McCain (Harris) in the presidential campaign.
Olive Kitteridge is an American television miniseries based on Elizabeth Strout's 2008 novel Olive Kitteridge. Set in Maine, the HBO miniseries features Frances McDormand as the title character, Richard Jenkins as Olive's loving husband Henry Kitteridge, Zoe Kazan as Denise Thibodeau, and Bill Murray as Jack Kennison.The show is divided into four parts, each depicting a certain point of time in the novel.

The Seventies,The Eighties,The Nineties,The 2000s,The 2010s is a documentary miniseries which premiered on CNN  Produced by Tom Hanks and Gary Goetzman's studio Playtone, the 10-part series chronicled events and popular culture of the United States.

 

The Seventies,The Eighties,The Nineties,The 2000s,The 2010s series were a ratings success, CNN has since commissioned follow-ups spanning the following decades, including The 70s (2015).

The 80s (2016) , The 90s (2017), The 2000s (2018) and The 2010s (2023). In 2018, Playtone, which recounted the events of 1968 in Episode 8 of this series, revisited the year in more detail in the four-part series 1968: The Year That Changed America.

 

The Sixties is a documentary miniseries which premiered on CNN on May 29, 2014. Produced by Tom Hanks and Gary Goetzman's studio Playtone, the 10-part series chronicled events and popular culture of the United States during the 1960s
The Seventies is a documentary miniseries which premiered on CNN on June 11, 2015. Produced by Tom Hanks and Gary Goetzman studio Playtone, and serving as a follow-up to The Sixties, the 8-part series chronicled events and popular culture of the United States during the 1970s. In February 2016, CNN announced that it would premiere a third installment in the franchise, The Eighties, on March 31, 2016.
The Eighties is a documentary miniseries which premiered on CNN on March 31, 2016.Produced by Tom Hanks and Gary Goetzman's studio Playtone, it serves as a follow-up to the predecessors The Sixties and The Seventies ] with a 7-part series chronicling events and popular culture of the United States during the 1980s. In May 2016, CNN greenlit an 8-part follow-up titled The Nineties, which premiered in 2017.
The Nineties is a documentary miniseries which premiered on July 9, 2017, on CNN. Produced by Tom Hanks and Gary Goetzman's studio Playtone, the 7-part series chronicles events and popular culture of the United States during the 1990s. It serves as a follow-up to the predecessors The Sixties, The Seventies, and The Eighties. CNN greenlit the series in May 2016. One of the episodes, "Isn't It Ironic?", was screened at SeriesFest. CNN subsequently greenlit two more Playtone/Herzog miniseries for 2018: The 2000s, as well a four-part series premiering over Memorial Day weekend, 1968: The Year That Changed America.
The 2000s is a documentary miniseries which premiered on July 8, 2018, on CNN. Produced by Tom Hanks and Gary Goetzman's studio Playtone, the 7-part series chronicles events and popular culture of the United States during the 2000s. It served as a follow-up to the predecessors The Sixties, The Seventies, The Eighties, and The Nineties. CNN greenlit the series in May 2016
The Movies is a documentary miniseries that premiered on CNN on July 7, 2019. Produced by Tom Hanks and Gary Goetzman's studio Playtone, the six-part series chronicles the cinema of the United States, ranging from the "Golden Age of Hollywood" to the present day. It is a spin-off of Hanks and Goetzman's retrospective miniseries for CNN (including The Sixties and its sequels).
The 2010s is a documentary miniseries which premiered on May 7, 2023, on CNN. Produced by Tom Hanks and Gary Goetzman's studio Playtone, the 7-part series chronicles events and popular culture of the United States during the 2010s. It serves as the final installment of the "Decades Series", following The Sixties, The Seventies, The Eighties, The Nineties, and The 2000s.The first episode, "Peak TV", was screened at SeriesFest.